Well, I’m starting off with a clean slate; all the old posts are deleted and I’m starting with a clean slate with focus on reforming ones life in the coming year. One of the things I have done is sell off my Apple Watch – one of those things you buy in an impulse because you think, “hey, that would be nice something nice” but then you realise a few months later, having barely used it, that maybe what you liked was the idea of having it rather than actually having it. I’ll be sending it off tomorrow before work if I have time but lets just chalk it up as a lesson learned – don’t get sucked into gadget envy.

macOS 10.15 Beta 10 has been released with no hint that it is getting closer to being a GM (normally if it is a GM they’ll mark it as a GM – at that point they’re ready to ship but they want to ensure that there are no show stopper bugs that might cause problems for end users) but in the mean time Apple has pushed out a few updates for 10.14.6 which involves a supplementary update 2, Safari 13 and then an update to Safari 13 (13.0.1) shortly after that Safari 13 update. Safari 13 has been horrendously buggy even with the subsequent update (13.0.1) which has pretty much forced me to move over to Chrome to at least get a resemblance of reliability.

L’shanah tovah everyone, part of starting a new year is clearing out all the old cruft and that involves deleting all the old ‘hot takes’ that I look back on, be it on my blog or twitter account, cringe and then realise that it is probably best to start with a clean slate. Part of this new start also involves having a bit of more of a humble outlook on life by asking the simple, but important question, am I commenting on a topic I know something about because I can contribute something useful to the discussion or am I responding because I crave the validation of receiving a reply from someone else along with the usual retweets, likes and so on.

In the blog world it isn’t such a major issue because the way a blog is written lends itself to a more formal writing style where as twitter is closer to that of a chat session when one is using Google Hangouts or Facebook Messenger. The problem is that the messaging is quick but that quickness does get people into trouble (I include myself in that group). I myself have gotten myself into trouble because of the truncated way in which tweets need to be formulated resulting in much needed context being lost. When I read my own post it all makes sense because I know what I mean when I write something because I already have all the context in my head but obviously the person reading it on the other side the world doesn’t hence that gap between what I want to say, what is said and how it is understood can only be based on what I include in a tweet.